The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA); in Spanish: Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte, TLCAN; In French: North American Free Trade Agreement, ALNA) was an agreement signed by Canada, Mexico and the United States, creating a trilateral trade bloc in North America. The agreement came into force on January 1, 1994 and replaced the 1988 Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement. [3] The NAFTA trading bloc was one of the largest trading blocs in the world, after the proceeds of the home. On June 1, 2020, the USTR Office issued the uniform rules[30] which are the last hurdle before the implementation of the agreement on July 1, 2020. According to a 2013 Jeff Faux article published by the Economic Policy Institute, California, Texas, Michigan and other high-concentration manufacturing states were most affected by NAFTA job losses. [97] According to a 2011 article by EPI economist Robert Scott, the trade agreement has “lost or supplanted” some 682,900 U.S. jobs. [98] Recent studies have agreed with congressional Research Service reports that NAFTA has little influence on manufacturing employment and automation, accounting for 87% of manufacturing job losses.

[99] During the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Donald Trump`s campaign included a promise to renegotiate or eliminate NAFTA if the renegotiations fail. [21] After the election, Trump made a series of changes that influenced trade relations with other countries. The exit from the Paris Agreement, the cessation of participation in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations and the significantly larger increase in tariffs with China were some of the steps he took, which reinforced the fact that he was serious about changing NAFTA. [22] Much of the debate about the virtues and errors of the USMCA resembles the debate on all free trade agreements (FTAs), such as the nature of free trade agreements as public goods, potential violations of national sovereignty and the role of commercial, labour, environmental and consumer interests in the development of the language of trade agreements. On May 30, U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer presented Congress with a draft declaration on the administrative steps needed to implement the U.S.-Mexico Agreement (USMCA and the new NAFTA), in accordance with the 2015 Presidential Trade Promotion (TPA) Administrative Action Statement. The project will allow congress to be presented to Congress, after 30 days, on June 29, a law to implement the USMCA. In a letter [73] to Nancy Pelosi, House of Representatives spokeswoman Kevin McCarthy, the minority leader of the House of Representatives, the Republican, told Lighthizer that the USMCA was the gold standard in U.S. trade policy, modernizing the competitive trade in digital, intellectual property and services in the United States and creating a level playing field for U.S. businesses.

, workers and farmers, an agreement that represents a fundamental shift in trade relations between Mexico and Mexico. On December 19, 2019, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the USMCA with multiparty support with 385 votes (Democracy 193, Republican 192) to 41 (Democracy 38, Republican 2, Independent 1). [79] On January 16, 2020, the U.S. Senate passed the trade agreement by 89 votes (Democrats 38, Republicans 51) to 10 (Democracy 8, Republican 1, Independent 1)[80] and the bill was forwarded to the White House for the signature of Donald Trump. [81] On January 29, 2020, Trump signed the agreement (Public Law No: 116-113). [82] NAFTA has been formally amended,[83] but not the 1989 Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, which is only “suspended.” [84] [85] On June 1, 2020, USTR Robert Lighthizer`s office unlocked the uniform rules, which are the final hurdle before the agreement is implemented on July 1, 2020.